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Nitrous Vs Turbo

Though every engine can be turbocharged, that doesn’t mean some naturally aspirated car owners would want to add them to the power plant currently residing under the hood. A combination of power and traction is required to control an engine’s potential and transfer it to the wheels.

One place where you see the turbo versus non-turbo debate is at the local drag strip or race track. Many of the racers have different experiences when it comes to boosting the parts installed.

Drivers who have small displacement motors may choose to include a turbo to get the response they need on a race track when they push their RPM to the limit. These foreign made “rice burners” could never compete against some of the big displacement muscle car motors that you’ll find on the race tracks. Not without adding a powerful turbo to their engine package. This may be the perfect solution for them, but it is not something a big displacement engine owner considers when they want to increase the power and performance, as well as transfer of that power to the streets through the wheels.

The first fallacy of turbos is that you get extra power at any throttle opening. This is false. A turbo compression wheel does not create maximum boost until the throttle is in a WOT (wide open throttle) position for a number of seconds. You may never WOT a throttle around town streets as a turbo would let the daily driver down when it comes to throttle response.